ACS DAC: Nanofabrication and Nanoconstructs for Chemical Separations

Feb 25, 2014

Session 1460, Room S401d, 8:30 a.m.

Lisa A. Holland, of West Virginia University (Morgantown, West Virginia), will preside over this Wednesday morning session.

The session will begin with a presentation by Susan V. Olesik, of Ohio State University (Columbus, Ohio) titled “Nanostructured Materials for Liquid Chromatographic Separations.” Olesik’s talk will illustrate substantial improvements in chromatographic efficiencies using organized nanostructures without the expect gain in enhanced pressure drop. It will also illustrate the unique range of chromatographic selectivity through the use of highly organized carbon nano structures.

The next presentation will be by Luis A. Colon, of the University at Buffalo – SUNY (Buffalo, New York). The talk, titled “Carbon-based Nanomaterials for Chemical Separations,” will focus on the production and various characteristics of the nanomaterials, as well as their attachment to silica support. In addition, characterization of the silica modified material (e.g., TEM, FTIR, and XPS), and their initial chromatographic behavior will be presented.

Linda B. McGown, of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, New York) will present next with “2D Microfluidic Separation of DNA by Length and Sequence.” McGowen will discuss the use of a new, two-dimensional microfluidic platform that will use conventional sieving gels to separate ssDNA based on length in the first dimension and simple salts to separate DNA by sequence in the second dimension.

After a 15-minute recess, the symposium will continue with a presentation by Charles A. Lucy, of the University of Alberta (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) titled “Nano-Scaffolds for Construct of Biocompatible Coatings in Capillary Electrophoresis.” This presentation will discuss a semi-permanent biocompatible coating that uses a surfactant bilayer as scaffolding upon which to build a hydrophilic coating.

The final presentation of this symposium will be by Lisa A. Holland, of West Virginia University, whose talk is titled “Reversible Nanogels for Microscale Separations with Tunable Selectivity.” Holland will show how complex samples are simplified using integrated serial processing to generate electropherograms that can be easily interpreted.