Duke Molecular Physiology Institute Receives Agilent Grant - - Chromatography Online
Duke Molecular Physiology Institute Receives Agilent Grant

LCGC Europe eNews

Agilent Technologies (California, USA) has awarded a grant to the Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University (North Carolina, USA) to support research into the metabolic and physiological aspects of major chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. The institute researchers perform a range of analytical chemistry techniques, including liquid chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, to characterize molecular pathways in disease.

The group is headed by Christopher Newgard, professor at Duke University School of Medicine's Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and director of the Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center and the Institute for Molecular Physiology. He said: "The Duke Molecular Physiology Institute seeks to combine strong genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics platforms with computational biology, clinical translation, and basic science expertise to gain new insights into the mechanisms of cardiometabolic diseases.” He added: "We thank Agilent for supporting our research and look forward to collaborating to advance the understanding of cardiovascular and undiagnosed metabolic diseases."

Steve Fischer, Agilent’s director of ‘Omics Applications, said: "We are pleased to support Dr Newgard and his team at Duke for their pioneering translational research." He added: "They will use the power of integrating different 'omics data to better understand complex disease mechanisms and map out previously unknown pathways to disease phenotypes. This should accelerate their understanding of complicated processes in cardiometabolic diseases and lead to the faster development of treatments."

For more information please visit: www.agilent.com

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