Thermo Fisher Scientific Center for Multiplexed Proteomics at Harvard Medical School Established - - Chromatography Online
Thermo Fisher Scientific Center for Multiplexed Proteomics at Harvard Medical School Established

LCGC Europe eNews

Thermo Fisher Scientific (California, USA) and Harvard Medical School (Boston, USA) have teamed up to establish the Thermo Fisher Scientific Center for Multiplexed Proteomics at Harvard Medical School. The facility has been set up for the development of new methods for protein quantitation, as well as the development of training courses to make expertise available to the wider community.

Steven Gygi, Harvard Medical School cell biology professor, said: “This new center is the first of its kind. Our goal was to bring disruptive technologies in quantitative proteomics to as many researchers as possible. Multiplexing 10 protein samples, be they from cells, tissues, or fluids, represents a landmark increase. This facilitates complicated experimental designs including time-course and dose-response studies. Combining new isobaric reagents with purpose-driven instrumentation allows for proteome-wide measurements of protein expression differences simultaneously across 10 samples in about 24 hours. It is simply fantastic.”

Iain Mylchreest, VP, research and development, chromatography and mass spectrometry, Thermo Fisher Scientific, said: “We feel that this collaboration and new multiplexed analysis capability will usher in a new era in functional proteomics, increasing understanding of mechanisms of disease and evaluation of potential new therapies.”

For more information visit: www.thermoscientific.com

ADVERTISEMENT

blog comments powered by Disqus
LCGC E-mail Newsletters
Global E-newsletters subscribe here:




 

LCGC COLUMNISTS 2014

Column Watch: Ron Majors, established authority on new column technologies, keeps readers up-to-date with new sample preparation trends in all branches of chromatography and reviews developments. LATEST: Avoiding Reversed-Phase Chromatography Problems Through Informed Method Development Practices: Choosing the Stationary-Phase Chemistry


Perspectives in Modern HPLC: Michael W. Dong is a senior scientist in Small Molecule Drug Discovery at Genentech in South San Francisco, California. He is responsible for new technologies, automation, and supporting late-stage research projects in small molecule analytical chemistry and QC of small molecule pharmaceutical sciences. LATEST: Seven Common Faux Pas in Modern HPLC


MS — The Practical Art: Kate Yu brings her expertise in the field of mass spectrometry and hyphenated techniques to the pages of LCGC. In this column she examines the mass spectrometric side of coupled liquid and gas-phase systems. Troubleshooting-style articles provide readers with invaluable advice for getting the most from their mass spectrometers. LATEST: Radical Mass Spectrometry as a New Frontier for Bioanalysis


LC Troubleshooting: LC Troubleshooting sets about making HPLC methods easier to master. By covering the basics of liquid chromatography separations and instrumentation, John Dolan is able to highlight common problems and provide remedies for them. LATEST: Estimating Resolution for Marginally Separated Peaks


More LCGC Columnists>>

LCGC North America Editorial Advisory Board>>

LCGC Europe Editorial Advisory Board>>

LCGC Editorial Team Contacts>>


Source: LCGC Europe eNews,
Click here