Featured LCGC Interviews

Miniaturizing Biomarker Detection

The development of novel microfluidic systems opens up new opportunities to quantify clinically relevant biomolecules to further the understanding and diagnosis of disease. The 2015 recipient of the AES Mid-Career Award, Adam T. Woolley, from Brigham Young University, Utah, is working in this area to develop novel and sophisticated integrated microfluidic systems for enhanced biomarker quantitation and quantification. He recently spoke to LCGC about this work.

Liquid Chromatography

Removal of Contaminant Peaks in Reversed-Phase Gradient Liquid Chromatography for Improved Detection of Pharmaceutical Impurities

By Krina Patel

Removal of Contaminant Peaks in Reversed-Phase Gradient Liquid Chromatography for Improved Detection of Pharmaceutical Impurities

Questions of Quality: Where Can I Draw The Line?

By R.D. McDowall

A question that keeps raising its head when working in a regulated laboratory is can chromatographers integrate peaks manually? If they can, when can they do it? Also if they can manually integrate, when should they not do it?

Tips & Tricks GPC/SEC: Answering Common Questions About GPC/SEC Columns

By Daniela Held, Wolfgang Radke

A selection of commonly asked questions about GPC/SEC from users.

Gas Chromatography

Separating and Identifying Trace-Level Chemicals in Wine by Headspace SPME with GC×GC–TOF MS

By Steve Smith, Laura McGregor, David Barden

Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC–TOF-MS) can be used to detect trace-level fungicides and compounds responsible for undesirable attributes known as “organoleptic faults” in wine. This article explains more.

An Accurate-Mass Database for Screening Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables by Gas Chromatography–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

By Noelia Belmonte, Samanta Uclés, Miguel Gamón, Carmen Ferrer, Milagros Mezcua, Amadeo R. Fernández–Alba

The main objective of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of gas chromatography (GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for screening pesticides in fruits and vegetables using a purpose-built accurate-mass database.

An Improved GC–MS Method for Cigarette Smoke Characterization Using a Novel Cold Trap, Dual Column, and Cryofocusing System

By M. Rotach, E. Rouget, J.R. Crudo

The development of a novel trapping system and a modified GC–MS layout (using dual chromatographic columns and cryogenic focusing devices) has enabled a major improvement in the chromatographic separation of volatile and semivolatile compounds in cigarette smoke. This improvement has led to the potential for identifying compounds which are usually masked by the solvent peak.

Mass Spectrometry

GC–MS Analysis of Aroma Compounds in Edible Oils by Direct Thermal Desorption

By Alexander Hasselbarth, Oliver Lerch

Determining aroma compounds and off-flavours in edible oils by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) is routine in many food-producing companies; however, the oily matrix needs to be kept out of the analytical instrument to avoid impacting analytical stability. The following article describes a simple, yet efficient, way of eliminating the matrix while determining the flavour compounds in a sensitive and selective manner.

Rapid and Accurate LC–MS-MS Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds in Urine Using Raptor Biphenyl LC Columns and MS-Friendly Mobile Phases

By Shun-Hsin Liang, Restek Corporation

A rapid, accurate, and reproducible method was developed for high-throughput testing of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3’-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and anabasine in urine. Data show that a fast and highly efficient analysis of these basic compounds can be achieved with the Raptor Biphenyl column using standard reversed-phase LC–MS mobile phases that are compatible with a variety of LC–MS instrumentation.

Rapid and Accurate LC–MS-MS Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds in Urine Using Raptor Biphenyl LC Columns and MS-Friendly Mobile Phases

By Shun-Hsin Liang, Restek Corporation

A rapid, accurate, and reproducible method was developed for high-throughput testing of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3’-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and anabasine in urine. Data show that a fast and highly efficient analysis of these basic compounds can be achieved with the Raptor Biphenyl column using standard reversed-phase LC–MS mobile phases that are compatible with a variety of LC–MS instrumentation.

Sample Preparation Techniques

Advances in Microsampling for In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Studies

By Nurith Amitai, Hong Xin, Daniel Kassel, Stuart Kushon

Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) is gaining traction because it delivers the benefits of dried blood spots (DBS) and overcomes its limitations while generating comparable PK data to conventional sampling methods. This article explains more.

Simplifying Liquid Extractions

By Erica Pike

The benefits of supported liquid extraction (SLE) in sample cleanup and, in particular, the use of a synthetic SLE sorbent are discussed.

Pyrolysis for the Preparation of Macromolecules and Analysis by Gas Chromatography

By Douglas E. Raynie

When pyrolyzed, macromolecules will decompose into smaller fragments that can have the appropriate volatility for gas chromatography (GC) separation and analysis.

Partner Organizations

 

Sepu, China's Largest Chromatography Training Site

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Chinese American Chromatography Association (CACA)

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ChromAcademy

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LCGC Blog

The LCGC Blog: Paired Ion Electrospray Ionization for Trace Anion Analysis

By Kevin A. Schug

Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to perform quantitative binding analyses and determine association constants depends on the ability of the ionization process to preserve the system equilibrium. If association or dissociation kinetics are relatively fast, then the shrinking-droplet ESI process can alter equilibria. This is not good for studying noncovalent complexation in solution, but it is central to the success of a technique called paired ion electrospray ionization (PIESI).

The LCGC Blog: Eight Steps to Better Results from Solid-Phase Extraction

By Tony Taylor

If you use SPE in your work, then most likely it’s very important to the success of your applications, and its proper implementation will be key to the performance of your analyses. In an effort to help you develop a better understanding of the technique, LCGC blogger Tony Taylor offers eight steps to solid-phase extraction success.

Latest News

David S. Bell Joins LCGC’s Editorial Advisory Board

LCGC Magazine is pleased to announce the addition of David S. Bell to its editorial advisory board.

Phyllis R. Brown, Pioneering Chromatographer, Dies at 91

World-renowned chromatographer Phyllis R. Brown died on July 8 in Providence, Rhode Island, at the age of 91. Analytical scientists around the world knew her as the “mother of high performance liquid chromatography” or the “mother of analytical chemistry.”

Thermo Fisher Scientific Proteomics Facility for Disease Target Discovery Opens at Gladstone Institutes

The Thermo Fisher Scientific Proteomics Facility for Disease Target Discovery opened at the Gladstone Institutes (San Francisco, California) on June 24, as part of a collaboration between Thermo Fisher (San Jose, California), Gladstone, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and QB3 (San Francisco, California), to accelerate targeted proteomics research using advanced mass spectrometry techniques.

UHPSFC–MS Analysis of Complex Lipid Samples

Researchers at the University of Pardubice in the Czech Republic have developed a high-throughput ultrahigh-performance supercritical fluid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UHPSFC–MS) method that can analyze lipidomic samples in as little as 6 min.

Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Joins Waters Centers of Innovation Program

The Taipei’s Chang Gung University (CGU) Healthy Aging Research Center has joined the Waters Centers of Innovation (COI) Program as a partner, making it the first in Taiwan to do so.

Webcasts

Latest Developments & Future Directions in Data Processing & Analysis Software for LC-MS-MS & GC-MS-MS

Part 4: Wednesday, 15 July 2015  — 8 am PDT, 11 am EDT, 4 pm BST, 5 pm CEST

 

Editors’ Series: Part 2: Application of Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography in Pharmaceutical Analysis
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 — 10 am EDT/ 3 pm BST/ 4 pm CEST 

 

HPLC Troubleshooting: Tips and Tricks

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 — 2 pm - 3 pm EDT 

More Upcoming & On Demand Webcasts>>

 

LCGC eBooks

Advancing Biopharma Analysis with Light-Scattering Detection

To characterize biopharmaceuticals, particularly monoclonal antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs), you need a complete toolbox of powerful tools. You are probably familiar with LC–MS methods. But have you seen what light-scattering detection can do?

Go to E-Book Library>>

 

CHROMacademy

Fundamentals of GC–MS Ionisation Techniques

Understanding how an instrument works is great, but when do you have time to read a textbook, or go to a course? Let CHROMacademy help. Dip in and out of concise modules and take 5 minutes to learn a little about the fundamentals of your analytical technique. Why not delve into GC-MS ionisation techniques right now?

Helium to Hydrogen — A Change Would Do You Good

Change is always a scary concept but let us dispel some of the fear associated with changing your helium carrier gas to hydrogen by answering some of the most common questions posed to us.

Reversed-Phase HPLC for the Analysis of Biomolecules

The following article from LCGC's ChromAcademy introduces the fundamentals of biopharmaceutical analysis and cover the use of reversed-phase HPLC in the analysis of biomolecules.

HPLC Troubleshooting Guide to Cycling Baselines and Pressure Fluctuations

HPLC troubleshooting guide to cycling baselines and pressure fluctuations from LCGC's ChromAcademy.

My LC–MS isn’t behaving! Where do I start?

Instrument manufacturers try to convince us that mass spec is just another detector. Most of us who work with LC-MS know that’s simply not the case – they can be maintenance intensive, unforgiving and generate complex information. When they’re not working it can be difficult to work out exactly where the problem lies. Here’s some advice to point you in the right direction