The Column-03-20-2014

This article reviews key developments and potential advantages of using LC–MS for forensic toxicology, including the option of using oral fluid samples.

The Column

Mike Callahan, an analytical chemist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (Maryland, USA), led a team to develop a new nano LC–nano ESI–MS method to detect life's building blocks in "spacedust". Callahan spoke to The Column about the inspiration behind the project, the challenges of analyzing extraterrestrial material in the laboratory, and future directions.

Silicone wristbands promoting charitable organizations and which are popular throughout the world as a fashion statement can be used to monitor exposure of individuals to contaminants in their local environment, according to a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.1 The authors of the study propose silicone bands as passive samplers that can give a temporal and spatial picture of human contaminant exposure.

The Column
Articles

March 20, 2014

Incognito discusses the impending technological singularity of analytical chemistry. Is it time to take back control from the machine?

The Column
Articles

March 20, 2014

This article details how a newly developed ?dilute-and-shoot? sample preparation methodology for LC–MS–MS multi-residue monitoring (MRM) pesticide screening can enable operators to overcome the matrix effects that have traditionally hindered routine food analysis.

Scientists from the University of Florence in Italy have developed a novel fast ion chromatographic (FIC) method for the analysis of fluoride in Antarctic snow and ice. Data from fluoride analysis has the potential to assist scientists to build up a picture of past volcanic activity.

Click the title above to open The Column March 20, 2014 North American issue, Volume 10, Number 5, in an interactive PDF format.

Click the title above to open The Column March 20, 2014 Europe & Asia issue, Volume 10, Number 5, in an interactive PDF format.