Chiral HPLC Separation of Enatiomers of Racemic Drugs Used in the Pharmaceutical Industry

September 1, 2008
Orochem Technologies, Inc.

The Application Notebook

The Application Notebook, The Application Notebook-09-01-2008, Volume 0, Issue 0

A large percentage of commercial and investigational pharmaceutical compounds are enantiomers and many of them show significant enantioselective differences in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The importance of chirality of drugs has been increasingly recognized, and the consequences of using them as racemates or as enantiomers have been frequently discussed in the pharmaceutical literature during recent years. With increasing evidence of problems related to stereoselectivity in drug action, enantioselective analysis by chromatographic methods has become the focus of intensive research of separation scientists. Most of the pharmaceutical and pharmacological studies of stereoselectivity of chiral drugs before the mid eighties involved pre-column derivatization of the enantiomers with chiral reagents forming diastereomers.

Orochem Technologies, Inc.

A large percentage of commercial and investigational pharmaceutical compounds are enantiomers and many of them show significant enantioselective differences in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The importance of chirality of drugs has been increasingly recognized, and the consequences of using them as racemates or as enantiomers have been frequently discussed in the pharmaceutical literature during recent years. With increasing evidence of problems related to stereoselectivity in drug action, enantioselective analysis by chromatographic methods has become the focus of intensive research of separation scientists. Most of the pharmaceutical and pharmacological studies of stereoselectivity of chiral drugs before the mid eighties involved pre-column derivatization of the enantiomers with chiral reagents forming diastereomers.

Figure 1

The preference of chiral stationary phases lays in the inherent advantages of any chromatographic separation, such as the speed of the analysis, the possibility to analyze or purify the enantiomers in complex mixtures, the reproducibility of the analysis and its flexibility. Moreover, analytical chromatographic systems can be adapted to preparative separations, in which pure enantiomers can be collected.

Orochem Technologies, Inc., a Biotech Company based in Lombard Illinois has developed a range of Chiral HPLC columns designed to efficiently separate chiral isomers with high resolution. Given below are a few examples of chiral separation on Orochem Technologies CSP-1 columns. Please contact asha@orochem.com or (630)916-0225 for further information.

Orochem Technologies, Inc.,

331 Eisenhower Ln South, Lombard, IL 60148

Tel: 630-916-0225

www.orochem.com