Fatty acid accumulation

January 16, 2012

The Column

Volume 8, Issue 1
Page Number: 12

A team of scientists in China have conducted a study to assess the relationship between liver fatty acid accumulation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

A team of scientists in China have conducted a study to assess the relationship between liver fatty acid accumulation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).1 NAFLD is one of the most frequent causes of abnormal liver function. As fatty acids can damage biological membranes, fatty acid accumulation in the liver may be partially responsible for the functional and morphological changes that are observed in non-alcoholic liver disease.

The team used an experimental mouse model of NALFD induced by high-fat feed and CCI4 and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the fatty acid composition. C57BL/6J mice were given high-fat feed for six weeks to develop NAFLD. They were also given injections of a 40% CCI4-vegetable oil mixture twice a week.

After the six weeks were over it was concluded that NAFLD had developed in the C57BL/6J mice. High-fat feed and CCI4 led to significant increases in C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C20:3 (P

The team concluded that the data was consistent with the hypothesis that fatty acids are deranged in mice with non-alcoholic fatty liver injury induced by high-fat feed and CCI4.

1. Xiuying Zhang et al., Lipids in Health and Disease, 2011, 10: 234

This story originally appeared in The Column. Click here to view that issue.