Overview of Recent Developments in Ultrafast Chromatography: From Theory to Applications

February 21, 2018

This Wednesday afternoon organized contributed session, organized by Erik L. Regalado and Christopher J. Welch, will provide an overview of recent developments in fast chromatography from theory to applications including high throughput analysis, second dimension of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC), MISER (multiple injections in a single experimental run) techniques, ultrafast LC autosamplers, hyphenation with mass spectrometry, and microfluidic devices.

Session 1510

Room 208B

1:30–4:25 p.m.

This Wednesday afternoon organized contributed session, organized by Erik L. Regalado and Christopher J. Welch, will provide an overview of recent developments in fast chromatography from theory to applications including high throughput analysis, second dimension of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC), MISER (multiple injections in a single experimental run) techniques, ultrafast LC autosamplers, hyphenation with mass spectrometry, and microfluidic devices.

The first talk in the session is titled “Ultrafast High-Throughput SFC for Analysis of Pharmaceutical Compounds and Intermediates” and will be presented by Chandan Barhate of AbbVie Inc. Barhate will discuss a study in which his team developed ultrafast chromatographic methods using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) for a variety of pharmaceutically-related drug targets and intermediates. The talk will focus on high-throughput screening method development using high-efficiency stationary phases.

Francesco Gasparrini of Sapienza University of Rome will present the second talk titled “On the Use of 2 µm - sub 2 µm Particles and Brush-Type Selectors in Enantioselective Ultra-High Performance Chromatography.” Gasparrini will address the increasing demand for ultrafast high performance chiral separations that has fostered the development of highly efficient packing materials for LC. In this talk, Gasparrini will present the recent achievements in enantioselective ultra high performance chromatography (eUHPC) focusing on brush-type chiral stationary phases (CSPs).

Next, a talk titled “Ultrafast Enantioselective Chromatography As the Second Dimension in 2D-LC Experiments” will be presented by session co-organizer Erik L. Regalado of Merck & Co., Inc. He will discuss an investigation into the use of ultrafast chiral chromatography as a second dimension for 2D chromatographic separations.

Fabrice Gritti of Waters Corporation will present next with a talk titled “Critical Contribution of Column Frits to the Separation Performance in High Throughput Liquid Chromatography.” The purpose of Gritti’s presentation is to reveal quantitatively the amount of sample dispersion caused by standard frits in 2.1 mm i.d. columns and its impact on high-throughput gradient liquid chromatography (HT-GLC) performance.

After a short recess, CJ Venkatramani of Genentech will present his talk titled “Simultaneous Achiral-Chiral Analysis of Pharmaceutical Compounds by 2D LC-SFC-MS.” Venkatramani’s presentation will cover the design and application of a 2D LC-SFC system in the analysis of compounds with multiple chiral centers. According to the abstract, the results of this study demonstrated the comparability of secondary SFC separation to conventional 1D SFC separation validating the proof of concept.

“Putting Fast Chromatography to Work: Recent Applications in High Throughput Analysis and MISER Kinetic Profiling of Organic Reactions,” is the next presentation in this session, which will be presented by session co-organizer Christopher Welch of Welch Innovation, LLC. Welch will present several recent examples showcasing applications of fast chromatography in high throughput screening for pharmaceutical process research, rapid chromatographic enantioseparation, and online analysis and kinetic profiling of organic reactions.

The penultimate talk will be given by J. Michael Ramsey of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His talk is titled “Microchip Electrophoresis Devices with Monolithically Integrated Electrospray Emitters for Rapid Analysis of Biological Materials.” Ramsey’s group pioneered the development of a sensitive, stable, and efficient microchip electrospray interface that enables the integration of MS detection with rapid and highly efficient microfluidic separation methods. Various elements of that research and the results will be described in this presentation.

The final talk in this session is titled “Chromatographic Separations at the Sensor Timescale: Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs,” and will be given by M. Farooq Wahab of the University of Texas at Arlington. Wahab’s talk will focus on a number of challenges and their solutions while demonstrating the utility of sub-second hyperfast separations.