U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) Proposes New Quality Standards for Food Chemical Codex 9th Edition

July 12, 2013
LCGC Europe eNews

Volume 0, Issue 0

The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) (Maryland, USA) has proposed new quality standards, or monographs, in its Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) 9th Edition for Spirulina, Brilliant Black PN, and pomegranate juice.

The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) (Maryland, USA) has proposed new quality standards, or monographs, in its Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) 9th Edition for Spirulina, Brilliant Black PN, and pomegranate juice.

Spirulina is dried out cyanobacteria, Arthospira platensis. It has high protein content and is widely found in specialty food bars, powdered nutritional drinks, popcorn, fruit, and fruit juices. The newly proposed USP monograph provides a test for the presence of microcystin toxins that can cause severe liver damage. The presence of microcystins can indicate adulteration of the product.

Brilliant Black PN is a synthetic food colouring used to give products a black colour, for example, jams, chocolate syrup, and sweets. This is not approved for use in the USA, but is approved in other companies.

Pomegranate juice is obtained from pomegranate fruits (Punica granatum). The FCC Identity Standard provides users with a series of identification tests and acceptance criteria. Tests for substances that should not be present, such as sorbitol and tartaric acid, are presented.

“USP’s public standards in the FCC define the identity, quality, and purity of food ingredients,” said V. Srini Srinivasan, USP’s executive vice president for Global Science and Standards, and chief science officer. He added: “These can be an important resource for manufacturers as they source ingredients from suppliers around the world, offering assurance that they are receiving what they expect. The new FCC Identity Standards take food safety one step further, not only describing a food ingredient, but [also] testing for components that could help manufacturers and formulators make sure their ingredients are not adulterated.”

Comments from manufacturers and third parties are invited at a free on-line FCC Forum (www.usp.org/fcc/fccForum.html) available until 30 September 2013.

For more information please visit:

www.usp.org