Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award

March 4, 2015

The 2015 Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award will be presented to Mark R. Schure, adjunct professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware, on Monday morning at Pittcon 2015.

Session 240, Room 243, 8:30 a.m.

The 2015 Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award will be presented to Mark R. Schure, adjunct professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware, on Monday morning at Pittcon 2015. The award will be presented by Mary Ellen McNally of EI DuPont de Nemours and Company. The Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley chooses award recipients based on their contributions to the fundamental understanding of the chromatographic process. The award was established in honor of Stephen Dal Nogare, who died in 1968 after serving for six months as president of the Chromatography Forum. Schure will be recognized for his contributions to separation science, including detailed theory, simulations and experimental investigations in 2D chromatography, chromatographic mechanisms, capillary electrophoresis, and field-flow fractionation.

A session of oral presentations will follow, with talks to be given by Schure on particle simulation methods in separation science research, Joseph J. DeStefano (Advanced Materials Technology, Inc.) on the superficially porous particles as an alternative to sub-2-µm totally porous particles for ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), Hernan J. Cortes (HJ Cortes Consulting) on the continuing evolution of multidimensional chromatography, Robert E. Murphy (Kroungold Analytical Inc.) on the analysis and characterization of bioconjugates by 2D liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS), and Joe Foley (Drexel University) on sequential elution LC with multimodal or serially coupled columns.

Schure received a B.S. degree from Northeastern University and a PhD from Colorado State University. His post-doctoral study was performed at the University of Utah. He worked for 23 years at Rohm and Haas Company doing computational, physical, and analytical research. He also founded Kroungold Analytical, a consulting company. He is the author of more than 100 papers.