The Chromatography Forum of Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award

March 2, 2020

This Monday morning session, in Room W181A, honors Ronald E. Majors, is the 2020 winner of the Dal Nogare Award, which is presented by the Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley.

This Monday morning session, starting at 8:30 in Room W181A, honors Ronald E. Majors, is the 2020 winner of the Dal Nogare Award, which is presented by the Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley. The Dal Nogare award is given to an outstanding scientist in the field of chromatography. The awardee is selected on the basis of his or her contributions to the fundamental understanding of the chromatographic process.

Majors will give the award address, focusing on his experience in liquid chromatography column development and sample preparation. In his talk on trends in high performance liquid chromagraphy (HPLC) columns and sample preparation technologies, he will discuss recent developments that have advanced LC separations as well as possible future directions for column development. He will also address the concept of “just enough sample preparation” as well as recent and potential future advances in sample preparation technologies.

Majors retired from Agilent Technologies, where he worked in sample preparation and column technology. He is a former LCGC columnist, writing both the “Column Watch” and “Sample Prep Perspectives” columns for LCGC North America for more than 30 years. Currently a member of LCGC’s editorial board, Majors has authored more than 150 publications on HPLC, gas chromatography (GC), sample preparation, and surface chemistry.

Following Majors’ talk, Richard Henry, who is an independent consultant, will talk about predicting future trends in HPLC column technology. Trends in particles, monolithic structures, and multiple dimensional column networks will be predicted.

Next, “Advances in Next Generation Superficially Porous Particles with Highly Ordered Pore Structures” will be discussed by William Barber of Agilent Technologies. Next generation SPPs have a pore structure that includes a thinner shell thickness and ordered pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. These new particles possess advantages such as a narrower particle size distribution, thinner porous layer with high surface area, and highly ordered, non-tortuous pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface.

After the recess, Mary Wirth of Purdue University will discuss her group’s research into the ability of thin polymer brush layers on silica to shield proteins from the silica surface to enable use of mass spectrometry (MS)-compatible mobile phase additives, and also to provide versatile chemical functionalities for selectivity in separations.

Peter Schoenmakers of the University of Amsterdam will close the session with a talk on columns and devices for multidimensional separations. LC columns will remain extremely important in the foreseeable future, but it is potentially rewarding to revisit planar separation systems and, especially, to create spatial three-dimensional LC systems. Progress in column-based LC×LC and in spatial multi-dimensional LC will be discussed.