High-Throughput Methods in LC, MS, and SFC

March 2, 2020

This afternoon session takes place in Room W176C. Zack Gurard-Levin of SAMDI Tech, will kick off the session with a talk describing the combination of high-density biochip arrays presenting self-assembled monolayers (SAMS) of alkanethiolates on gold with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS to create a technique, referred to as SAMDI.

This afternoon session takes place in Room W176C and starts at 1:30. Zack Gurard-Levin of SAMDI Tech, will kick off the session with a talk describing the combination of high-density biochip arrays presenting self-assembled monolayers (SAMS) of alkanethiolates on gold with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS to create a technique, referred to as SAMDI. Gurard-Levin will illustrate the use of SAMDI in drug discovery through assay development, hit identification, and lead optimization from proteins to cells.

Next, Xiaofeng Xie of Axcend Corporation will discuss using portable capillary liquid chromatography (LC) for automated on-line process reaction monitoring. By placing a portable capillary LC system next to an organic reaction vessel, minimal sample amount is consumed, and multiple samples can be analyzed in a timely manner-to assist in making critical decisions in a timely manner.

Daniel Steyer of the University of Michigan will speak next, giving a talk titled “Droplet Microfluidics and Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Screening Flow Reactions.” The MS-based screening of flow reactions has proven difficult, with demonstrated throughput limited to 45 s/sample. One avenue for expediting efforts in the screening of in-flow reactions is droplet microfluidics, where each individual sample is held separate by an immiscible phase, enabling the rapid manipulation and analysis of numerous reactions.

The next talk will be delivered by Abir Khaled of the University of Waterloo, who will discuss the growing concern about the widespread use of veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. Khaled will present the use of coated blade spray–MS/MS for rapid and high throughput screening and quantitation of 106 veterinary drugs in bovine tissue.

After the recess, the talks will continue with a presentation by Daipayan Roy of the University of Texas at Arlington that will describe a classification scheme for chiral stationary phases that can be used to qualitatively predict the effect of water on superficial fluid chromatography (SFC) separations.

Following Roy’s presentation, Shane Wells of the University of Michigan will discuss high throughput liquid–liquid extractions using nanoliter volumes. In this study, he demonstrates multiple applications of this technique including accurately and rapidly determining octanol-water partition coefficients. This was applied to five different drug molecules in human plasma, synthetic urine, and artificial cerebral spinal fluid and allowed for limits of detection (LODs) down to 7 nM for these drugs in human plasma.

The final talk of the session will be given by Chen Li of Purdue University. The discussion will address the depth-of-field (DoF) of optical imaging systems and how a DoF extension enables more crystals to be detected due to the polarization wavefront shaping via the micro-retarder array.