Liquid Chromatography – Bioanalytical

February 21, 2018

This Thursday afternoon session features eight presentations on the topic of liquid chromatography used in bioanalytical analysis.

Session 2100

Room 308B

1:30 pm–4:25 p.m.

This Thursday afternoon session features eight presentations on the topic of liquid chromatography used in bioanalytical analysis.

The first presentation will be from Shane L. Bechler of Thermo Fisher Scientific. “5 µm Particle Weak Cation Exchange Column for Fast, High Resolution Protein and mAb Analysis” will look at cation exchange chromatography and how it has become a method of choice for separating protein charge variants (for example, lysine truncation, oxidation, glycosylation, and so on). 

Next, Fabrice Gritti of Waters Corporation will present “Maximizing Peak Capacity of Microfluidic Columns by Combining Dynamically Solvent and Temperature Gradients.” In this presentation, a new class of gradients is proposed for microfluidic columns (i.d. smaller than 500 µm): the classical solvent gradient is combined with a non-stationary (finite linear velocity) and a non-uniform temperature (finite steepness) gradient.

Khanh T. Ngo of the University of Pittsburgh will present next with a talk titled “A Fast No-Net-Flux Method Utilizing Sub-Minute Online Mocrodialysis of Striatal Dopamine.” Ngo and colleagues optimized their online microdialysis system, enabling online monitor of striatal dopamine at 45 s time resolution. They capitalized this faster time resolution to design a method where a No-Net-Flux (NNF) experiment, which is typically done in 2–4 hours, can be performed in 18 minutes. 

The next talk will be given by Martha Knight of CC Biotech LLC. “New Protocols for Proteins and VPLS Using a Centrifugal Precipitation Chromatograph” will focus on a method of extending over a long time, the ammonium sulfate gradient at a low RPM and being able to purify some very high molecular weight proteins. 

After a brief recess, the session will continue with a presentation by Yongjing Chen of Thermo Fisher Scientific titled “Dual Electrolytic Eluent Generation for Oligosaccharides Analysis Using High Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatogrpahy.” Chen will present a new analytical method based on the use of dual electrolytic eluent generation platform and high performance anion-exchange liquid chromatography in both conventional and capillary separation formats for the analysis of oligosaccharides.

Erin P. Shields of the University of Pittsburgh will present next with a talk titled “Liquid Chromatography Stationary Phases Made Using the Thiol-yne Polymerization Reaction.” The thiol-yne reaction provides a robust, easy synthesis of highly crosslinked polymers. Shields and colleagues have used this click chemistry reaction to synthesize polymer coated stationary phases with differing characteristics without any catalysts that can harm chromatographic performance.

Following Shields, Michael T. Rerick of the University of Pittsburgh will talk about “Improving Online Sub-Minute Separations of Neurotransmitters Using Temperature-Assisted Solute Focusing with Capillary High Performance Liquid Chromatography.” The application of temperature-assisted solute focusing (TASF) devices was used to achieve simultaneous one-minute measurements of dopamine and serotonin.

The final presentation titled “A Bio-inert, Durable and Reliable Surface for HPLC and UHPLC Columns and Components Used in the Analysis of Proteins and other Difficult Molecules” will be given by Gary Barone of SilcoTek Corporation. The presentation will compare stainless steel, PEEK and Dursan-coated stainless steel with respect to chromatographic performance of difficult-to-analyze compounds. Discussion will center on the application flexibility of the coating, particularly to all parts of the flow path from frit to pump.