Proteomic Stroke Research

March 3, 2011

The Column

The Column, The Column-03-04-2011, Volume 7, Issue 4

Thermo Fisher Scientific has announced the initial findings of stroke research conducted by its Biomarker Research Initiatives in Mass Spectrometry (BRIMS) centre in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Harvard University. According to the company, the research provides potentially significant insight into patent foramen ovale (PFO) and its connection with strokes.

Thermo Fisher Scientific has announced the initial findings of stroke research conducted by its Biomarker Research Initiatives in Mass Spectrometry (BRIMS) centre in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Harvard University. According to the company, the research provides potentially significant insight into patent foramen ovale (PFO) and its connection with strokes.

PFO is a congenital heart abnormality that leaves a passage open between the left and right sides of the heart, enabling blood clots to travel from the leg to the brain. The collaborative research has provided scientists with MS data, from which potential biomarkers have been identified. If confirmed, these may be useful in helping doctors to select the most appropriate treatment for individual PFO stroke patients.

The collaboration has also led to insights in the understanding of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in stroke treatment. tPA is a drug that can only be safely administered within a very short time after stroke symptoms occur. The treatment, which works by dissolving blood clots, has proven highly effective but only 5% of patients fit the criteria within which it is safe to administer tPA. Through the use of proteomics workflows, the data may someday help identify a wider scope of patients who might benefit from tPA.

This story originally appeared in The Column. Click here to view that issue.