Supporting scientific innovation

December 2, 2010

The Column

The Column, The Column-11-19-2010, Volume 6, Issue 21

Waters has launched a programme to support scientific innovation in the fields of health and life science research, food safety and environmental protection.

Waters has launched a programme to support scientific innovation in the fields of health and life science research, food safety and environmental protection. The programme aims to offer research support and assistance to scientists in raising awareness of their ongoing research.

“With the Centers of Innovation Program, we are expanding our emphasis on collaborative relationships with some of the world’s foremost scientific experts,” said Tim Riley, vice president and director of the programme. Among the scientists involved in this programme is Professor Jeremy Nicholson, who works in the field of metabolomic profiling and molecular phenotyping, using the company’s UPLC separation system to characterize and classify the complex molecules produced by the metabolic system.

Also involved is Professor John Engen, who studies the influence of protein conformation on disease and whose past collaborations with Waters has resulted in the development of custom LC instrument, the nanoACQUITY UPLC System with HDX Technology.

Professor James Scrivens is also part of the programme; his group currently uses ion mobility enhanced mass spectrometry in a range of research projects in the biological sciences and has previously collaborated with Waters on the creation of the SYNAPT high definition mass spectrometry system, a shape-selective mass spectrometry instrument.

Additionally, Professor Julie Leary uses Waters equipment to study eukaryotic translation, the process by which messenger RNA is translated into proteins within the human 40S ribosome, to better understand how infectious diseases like hepatitis C and tuberculosis are transferred to humans.

For more information on the programme visit www.waters.com/coi

This story originally appeared in The Column. Click here to view that issue.