The Column-11-23-2016

Click the title above to open The Column November 23, 2016 Europe & Asia issue, Volume 12, Number 21, in an interactive PDF format.

Click the title above to open The Column November 23, 2016 North American issue, Volume 12, Number 21, in an interactive PDF format.

Research on nasal spray formulation has yielded an improved in vitro analytical test method utilizing thin layer chromatography (TLC). The research used simulated nasal mucus with varying properties and a TLC apparatus to assess the dripping behaviour of nasal formulations to improve the nasal spray development process.Nasal Spray Evaluation Using Thin Layer Chromatography

News
The Column

November 17, 2016

Rudolf Krska of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), in Vienna, Austria, has been awarded the biennial B.R.A.I.N award at the Biomin scientific conference held in Vancouver, Canada.

Phenomenex’s CEO Fasha Mahjoor has announced $12 million in bonuses for the company’s staff following the sale of Phenomenex Inc. to Danaher Corporation in October 2016.

News
The Column

November 17, 2016

Professor James Jorgenson of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in North Carolina, USA, has received the Csaba Horváth Medal and Scroll at the Csaba Horváth Memorial Award Symposium, Yale West Campus Conference Center.

The Column

Incognito defines the difference between a chromatographer and a chromatography user and elaborates on why we should care.

Change, while scary, is a necessity. Opportunities for increased efficiency, higher profitability, and the ability for an organization to maintain a competitive advantage necessitate the need for change. Correctly adopting new liquid chromatography (LC) technology can be very challenging, however, when done correctly, modern LC technology can give a laboratory the ability to simplify method transfer across a diversity of analytical LC platforms at all of its facilities.

The Column
Features

November 17, 2016

Although ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method development is fast and cost efficient, many of the analytical methods used in quality control laboratories are still conventional high performance LC (HPLC) separations. Transferring these HPLC methods to UHPLC and validating them is a time-consuming and labour-intensive task. Nevertheless, switching methods from HPLC to UHPLC equipment and vice versa is a powerful tool to increase laboratory efficiency. Modern systems with two flow lines in one system aim to simplify the transition between the two techniques.

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Environmental Chemistry Group, Water Science Forum, and the Separation Science Group Joint Meeting will be held on Friday 3 March 2017 at the Science Suite of the Royal Society of Chemistry, in Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, UK.

Faster analyses, better separations, and lower consumption of sample and mobile phase are the primary drivers of size-exclusion chromatography with sub-2-µm beads and ultrahigh-pressures (UHP-SEC). The flip side of these benefits is higher sensitivity to column calibration errors and drift. There is also a relatively small selection of column chemistries available for eliminating non-ideal sample-column interactions. UHP-SEC can be combined with on-line multi-angle light scattering (UHP-SEC-MALS) to overcome these limitations and provide absolute molar mass and size of biomacromolecules, independently of retention time. UHP-SEC-MALS is also necessary for UHP-SEC characterization of proteins and biotherapeutics that have no appropriate reference standards, such as glycoproteins and PEGylated proteins.