Applications of Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Room 204

E-Separation Solutions

Ion mobility spectrometry has found commercial success as a homeland security tool in the field detection of explosives, drugs, and chemical weapons. Other common uses for the technique have been in the pharmaceutical industry for cleaning validation and in the analysis of biological material. The applications to be discussed in this Wednesday morning session include the combination of IMS with MS, the characterization of carbohydrate?protein binding, protein and peptide analysis, IMS-MS analyses with elevated electric field intensities, and neutral ion pair evaporation from ionic liquid nanodroplets

Ion mobility spectrometry has found commercial success as a homeland security tool in the field detection of explosives, drugs, and chemical weapons. Other common uses for the technique have been in the pharmaceutical industry for cleaning validation and in the analysis of biological material. The applications to be discussed in this Wednesday morning session include the combination of IMS with MS, the characterization of carbohydrate–protein binding, protein and peptide analysis, IMS-MS analyses with elevated electric field intensities, and neutral ion pair evaporation from ionic liquid nanodroplets.

The first presentation will be given by Herbert H. Hill of Washington State University (Pullman, Washington). Hill, a long-time proponent of the IMS technique, will discuss how ion mobility–mass spectrometry provides molecular structure information about ions that is not possible to obtain using MS alone. He will review the various types of IM-MS instruments and their applications. The presentation is titled “Application Overview of Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled with Mass Spectrometry.”

Julie A. Leary of the University of California Davis (Davis, California) will present a talk titled “Ion Mobility Characterization of Carbohydrate:Protein Conformational Binding.” Her presentation will report the use of IM-MS to study the preferential binding of GAG to specific chemokine conformations.

The next presentation in the session, “A Shape Selective Study of Conformational Change in Metal Containing Proteins,” will be given by James Scrivens of the University of Warwick (Coventry, UK). He will discuss the use of IM-MS to measure metalloprotein conformational changes with and without a metal substrate.

Thomas Egan of Ionwerks (Houston, Texas) will present “Photofragmentation with VUV Post-Ionization Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Peptides and Sulfatides.” The talk will cover photofragmentation with laser desorption, ion mobility MS, optical parametric oscillator-IR, UV 349-nm desorption, and postionization.

Alexandre A. Shvartsburg’s (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) presentation, titled “Ultrafast Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Analyses at Extreme Electric Fields in Microscopic Multichannel FAIMS Chips,” will discuss how elevating the electric field intensity in FAIMS accelerates analyses and enables new separations.

The session’s final presentation, to be given by Juan Fernandez de la Mora of Yale University (New Haven, Connecticut), is titled “Observation of Neutral Molecule (Ion-Pair) Evaporation from Ionic Liquid Nanodroplets by Tandem Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry (DMA-MS).” His talk will describe the first measurements of single neutral ion pair evaporation from ionic liquid nanodroplets using the DMA-MS technique.