D-ficient

March 24, 2011

The Column

The Column, The Column-03-18-2011, Volume 7, Issue 5

As many as 70% of Americans may not be getting enough vitamin D but the average American does eat three slices of bread a day. A recent study has suggested that bread made from vitamin D-rich yeast could be used to bridge the gap.

As many as 70% of Americans may not be getting enough vitamin D but the average American does eat three slices of bread a day. A recent study has suggested that bread made from vitamin D-rich yeast could be used to bridge the gap.

Vitamin D contributes to healthy teeth and bones, and a deficiency in this vitamin has also been linked to an increased risk of heart disease and other conditions. It is produced by the skin from exposure to sunlight, and can be taken up from foods such as fortified milk; but studies have shown that the US population is not getting enough. Yeast can produce vitamin D when exposed to sunlight just like skin and so a study has been conducted to investigate the bioavailability of bread made from vitamin D-rich yeast by looking at its effect on plasma and bones in rats.1

The rats were fed crystalline vitamin D3 or D2-rich yeast baked into bread. Plasma 25OHD levels were then measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. An increase in plasma 25OHD status was observed in those fed the bread, confirming that it could act as a potential new food source of vitamin D.

E.E. Hohman et al., J. Agric. Food Chem. (2011).

This story originally appeared in The Column. Click here to view that issue.

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