Introduction: Advances in HPLC Systems Technology

Special Issues

Special Issues, Special Issues-04-03-2009, Volume 27, Issue 4
Pages: 7

During the last four to five years, chromatographers have witnessed some significant advances in technology, from the instrument perspective, with systems operating up to 15,000 psi using new and significantly improved detectors, sometimes operating in multiple dimensions, and from the column perspective, with smaller particle sizes and new chemistries and configurations.

During the last four to five years, chromatographers have witnessed some significant advances in technology, from the instrument perspective, with systems operating up to 15,000 psi using new and significantly improved detectors, sometimes operating in multiple dimensions, and from the column perspective, with smaller particle sizes and new chemistries and configurations. These new technologies are being driven by the ever-expanding need and challenge to get more and better information faster, all in an economic climate where cost control is also a primary concern. All while at the same time samples have become more and more complex, and detection limits are being driven increasingly lower.

Michael Swartz

To answer today's challenges, chromatographers are resorting to new paths that take advantage of available new technology, often in rather unique ways; sometimes simply by applying a new approach to a problem, like a new type of column or detector, other times by using combinations of new technologies where the end result is greater than the sum of the individual parts to tackle a particular issue. From new detectors gaining prominence, like coronal charged aerosol detection, and new column particle designs such as superficially porous particles and polymeric- and silica-based monoliths, to multidimensional and orthogonal applications of technology, chromatographers have an ever-expanding repertoire of tools available.

In this "Advances in HPLC Systems Technology" supplement to LCGC, I have assembled several articles dealing with the review and application of some new technology and approaches. The first is an article by Mark Schure that discusses the "comprehensive" mode of two dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) and answers the question: What applications require the resolving power that LC×LC can potentially deliver? The next article by Henrik Rasmussen and colleagues is a discussion with case studies on the use of orthogonal methods in pharmaceutical development with an emphasis on the chromatographic conditions selected to provide systematic othogonality for a broad range of drugs. A review of superficially porous and monolithic columns in fast-LC applications, with an emphasis on their preparation, properties, applications, comparison, and future perspectives is provided in the manuscript by Hassan Aboul-Enein and colleagues. A further, rather unique application of the superficially porous particles is described by Nelu Grinberg and colleagues in the following paper that highlights their use in very high pressure LC (VHPLC) for chiral compound analysis with mobile phase additives. Finally, an article by myself and colleagues describing the use of new detector technology, corona charged aerosol detection, for common pharmaceutical analyses in both the research and regulated laboratory is included.

I hope you find "Advances in HPLC Systems Technology" interesting and valuable. Hopefully you'll find something that might help you solve your separation challenges, or, perhaps stimulate some thought and discussion on new or improved approaches to tackle problems in your laboratory.

Michael Swartz

LCGC Editorial Advisory Board