Innovations in Ion and Liquid Chromatography

E-Separation Solutions

Four presentations were given Monday afternoon as part of an ongoing New Product Forum Series at Pittcon 2006. The session, entitled, "Innovations in Ion and Liquid Chromatography" was presided over by David S. Cifrulak. Cifrulak pointed out the importance of the new products and those who develop them. "They answer questions and satisfy needs of those who work at the bench," Cifrulak said.

Four presentations were given Monday afternoon as part of an ongoing New Product Forum Series at Pittcon 2006. The session, entitled, "Innovations in Ion and Liquid Chromatography" was presided over by David S. Cifrulak.Cifrulak pointed out the importance of the new products and those who develop them. "They answer questions and satisfy needs of those who work at the bench," Cifrulak said.

Kannan Srinivasan of Dionex Corporation (Sunnyvale, California), gave a presentation entitled "Novel Valve Switching Ion Chromatography Applications Using an ICS-3000 System and an Integrated Automation Manager." Rong Lin, Christopher A. Pohl, and Sheetal Saini, all from Dionex, were the co-authors of the presentation.The recently introduced ICS-3000 instrument has an integrated automation manager (AM) supporting various valve configurations and reaction coil heater. Srinivasan discussed the utility of the ICS-3000 system in conjunction with the AM module for various applications.

"The ICS-3000 was designed as a dual analysis system," Srinivasan said.

Ken Eglinton of Waters Corporation (Milford, Massachusetts) gave a presentation on "Automation of the Chromatographic Method Validation Process." Eglinton was presenting for Lauren Wood, also of Waters. Eglinton introduced software to automate the chromatographic method validation process. The software allows the user to assess the validation parameters of specificity, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, intermediate precision, reproducibility, robustness, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation. It also provides the ability to assess stability, filter validation, method transfer, and system precision.

A discussion on "The Universal Detection System," was given by Arnon Chait, Analiza, Inc. (Cleveland, Ohio). Chait's co-authors were Alexander Belgovskiy, Pamela Lechner, and Boris Zaslavsky.

Chait joked about the ironic nature of the title of his presentation. "We all know there is no such beast," Chait said.

The Universal Detection System (UDS) is an automated platform for flexible quantification of multiple compounds in solution. The UDS combines two instruments into an automated platform: Agilent's 1100 HPLC system running ChemStation control and analysis software, and Antek Instruments' CLND 8060 chemiluminescence detector.

A fourth presentation, named "Extremely High Efficiency Separations of Biological Molecules by Developing Sub-2 Micron Non-porous Ion-exchange Resins," was given by Xueying Huang of Sepax Technologies, Inc. Sean Huang, Chuping Luo, and Ryan Pringle also contributed to the report.

Huang detailed how they developed sub-2 micron ion-exchange resins based on the highly cross-linked polystyrene/divinyl benzene (PS/DVB) non-porous particles that can resist to as high as 8000 psi pressure.