Preparative and Process Chromatography

June 1, 2007

LCGC North America

LCGC North America, LCGC North America-06-01-2007, Volume 25, Issue 6
Pages: 528

lthough liquid chromatography (LC) is most commonly associated with analytical techniques that are found inside the laboratory, LC also has been used in industrial applications for separation of a wide range of products for decades. The technique recently has been applied to requirements in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, both inside the laboratory and in industrial settings. With global sales of over $1.7 billion, the market for preparative LC has encountered a stellar growth over the past few years.

Although liquid chromatography (LC) is most commonly associated with analytical techniques that are found inside the laboratory, LC also has been used in industrial applications for separation of a wide range of products for decades. The technique recently has been applied to requirements in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, both inside the laboratory and in industrial settings. With global sales of over $1.7 billion, the market for preparative LC has encountered a stellar growth over the past few years.

Worldwide preparative and process chromatography demand.

The steady growth of pharmaceutical and biotechnology research is continuing to drive strong demand for preparative chromatography, which has become a commonplace laboratory preparative technique for improving a wide range of analyses. With the increase of the number of drug candidates reaching clinical trial phases, and full approval, non-analytical chromatography is seeing dramatic growth at the pilot and process scales.

The preparative and process chromatography market, including prep HPLC and LPLC, flash, SFC, SMB, pilot, and process-scale chromatography, is likely to benefit from the FDA initiative to modernize the regulation guidelines of pharmaceutical manufacturing. Drug makers often have been reluctant to change manufacturing processes and equipment because of regulatory hurdles. Among other measures, an effort is being made to accommodate process changes that would support continuous process improvement and encouraging the use of modern tools.

The foregoing data was extracted from SDi's upcoming Market Analysis and Perspectives report titled Purification Applications for Process and Preparative Liquid Chromatography. For more information, contact Glenn Cudiamat, VP of Research Services, Strategic Directions International, Inc., 6242 Westchester Parkway, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90045, tel. (310) 641-4982, fax (310) 641-8851, e-mail cudiamat@strategic-directions.com