Ying Ge Receives Georges Guiochon Faculty Fellowship at HPLC 2016

June 22, 2016

The 2016 Guiochon Fellowship was presented to Ying Ge at HPLC 2016 in San Francisco, California.

The 2016 Guiochon Fellowship was presented to Ying Ge at HPLC 2016 in San Francisco, California.

Ge is an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her B.S. from Peking University in Beijing, China, and her PhD from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, under the joint supervision of Prof. Fred McLafferty and Prof. Tadhg Begley.

Following graduate school, Ge pursued a career in the pharmaceutical industry, starting as a scientist at Wyeth Research, and continuing as a group leader at PPD, Inc. In 2006, Ge joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison as the Director of Mass Spectrometry in the Human Proteomics Program. In 2012, she was appointed as an assistant professor in the Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology and Department of Chemistry. She was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2015.

Ge’s research is highly interdisciplinary, cutting across the traditional boundaries of chemistry, biology, and medicine. By creatively integrating her expertise in mass spectrometry (MS) and proteomics with cardiac biology and medicine, she aims to develop and employ novel top-down MS-based proteomics strategies in conjunction with functional studies to gain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cardiac disease and regeneration. Her laboratory recently developed a multipronged approach to address the challenges in top-down proteomics in a comprehensive manner. To address the challenge of proteome complexity, her laboratory has been developing novel multidimensional liquid chromatography strategies to separate intact proteins for top-down proteomics.

The Georges Guiochon Faculty Fellowship honors the memory of Georges Guiochon and recognizes his major contributions to HPLC, including his interest in the careers of young people in separations science. The Fellow, selected annually, receives a $15,000 research grant and a commemorative plaque. Eligibility for the award extends to all full-time faculty members at U.S. academic or government institutions who are within 10 years of their first independent research appointments. The fellowship is sponsored by HPLC, Inc.