Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award

March 1, 2016

The 2016 Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award will be presented to Stephen Weber, who is a Professor of Chemistry and Clinical Translational Science at the University of Pittsburgh, on Monday morning at Pittcon 2016. The award will be presented by Mary Ellen McNally of EI DuPont de Nemours and Company. The Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley chooses award recipients based on their contributions to the fundamental understanding of the chromatographic process. The award was established in honor of Stephen Dal Nogare, who died in 1968 after serving for six months as president of the Chromatography Forum.

  Session 220 Room B312, 8:30 a.m.   The 2016 Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley Dal Nogare Award will be presented to Stephen Weber, who is a Professor of Chemistry and Clinical Translational Science at the University of Pittsburgh, on Monday morning at Pittcon 2016. The award will be presented by Mary Ellen McNally of EI DuPont de Nemours and Company. The Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley chooses award recipients based on their contributions to the fundamental understanding of the chromatographic process. The award was established in honor of Stephen Dal Nogare, who died in 1968 after serving for six months as president of the Chromatography Forum.    A session of oral presentations will follow the award presentation, with talks to be given by Weber on capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and its advantages and limitations, Peter W. Carr (University of Minnesota) on optimizing performance (plate count) in LC, Robert T. Kennedy (University of Michigan) on the use of metabolomics to investigate neurotransmitters and peptides in the brain, J. Michael Ramsey (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) on microfabricated fluidic separation devices interfaced to mass spectrometry through integrated nanoelectrospray ionization, and Dwight R. Stoll (Gustavus Adolphus College) on optimizing the second dimension in two-dimensional LC separations.    Weber received a PhD in 1979 from McGill University for studying the theory and application of the electrochemical detector. His research involves analytical separations theory and application, and chromatographic detection and quantitation in bioanalytical chemistry, with a focus on neurochemistry.