Frontiers in Elemental Mass Spectrometry, Room 113

May 29, 2009
Steve Brown

E-Separation Solutions

Elemental mass spectrometry mainly targets inorganic materials, determining elemental compositions of samples rather than providing structural information. This session will cover topics such as bioimaging of metals in brain tissue, the analysis of chemical warfare agent degradation products, and the separation and quantitation of antisense oligonucleotides.

Elemental mass spectrometry mainly targets inorganic materials, determining elemental compositions of samples rather than providing structural information. This session will cover topics such as bioimaging of metals in brain tissue, the analysis of chemical warfare agent degradation products, and the separation and quantitation of antisense oligonucleotides.

The first presentation in the session will be given by Johanna Sabine Becker of Forshungszentrum Juelich (Juelich, Germany) and is titled “Bioimaging of Metals in the Brain by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to Study Neurodegenerative Diseases.” Becker will discuss the use of LA-ICP-MS with double-focusing sector field and quadrupole-based mass spectrometers to study the disease mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders in thin brain tissue sections.

The next talk, to be delivered by Karolin K. Kroening of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cincinnati (Ohio), is titled “Cytotoxicity of Arsenic-Containing Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation Products with Metallomic Approaches for Metabolite Analysis” and will cover important chemical changes related to the toxicity mechanisms of the chemical warfare agent degradation products of arsenic-containing “Blue Cross.”

Uwe Karst of the University of Münster (Münster, Germany) will present the next talk, “Speciation Analysis of Gadolinium Chelates in Hospital Effluents and Wastewater Treatment Plant Sewage by a Novel HILIC/ICP-MS Method.” This method reportedly is the first one developed for speciation analysis of five gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents in wastewaters; it uses a zwitterionic HILIC stationary phase with a quadrupole ICP-MS syste for independent quantification of the gadolinium species.

The fourth presentation in the session, “Characterization of Selenium Metabolites in Se-Enriched Kale via Ion-Pairing Reversed-Phase Chromatography with ICP-MS and ESI-IT-MS Detection,” will be delivered by Quilin Chan of the University of Cincinnati’s Department of Chemistry. The presentation will discuss element-specific speciation using the electrospray ionization-ion trap-MS combined with ICP-MS.

The penultimate presentation will be given by Lelie Herman from UCLA (Los Angeles, California) and is titled “Elucidating the Role of Metals in Amytrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using Inline Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.” The combination of LC and ICP-MS is used to obtain metallation information about the disease.

Finally, Renee N. Easter of the University of Cincinnati will present “Separation and Quantification of Antisense Oligonucleotides by Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography Coupled to ICP-MS.” Easter will discuss one of the first studies to separate and detect phosphorothioate oligonucleotides using HILIC-ICP-MS.