LCGC Europe-03-01-2018

Chromatographic principles and best practices for obtaining highly precise retention time, peak width, and resolution predictions for the optimization of reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) separations using retention modelling software will be discussed. The importance of fully characterizing the LC instrumentation, how to generate accurate input data, the selection of appropriate models, and peak tracking will be addressed along with a suggested workflow. Adhesion to a few basic rules and simple precautions and the use of modern retention modelling software programmes can assist the rapid development of highly accurate retention models to enable the development of robust and optimized reversed-phase LC separations using either ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions. Examples of retention modelling for small and large molecules will be highlighted.

When preparing buffers for hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) separations, is the buffer concentration considered relative to the aqueous portion of the eluent only, or to the aqueous-organic mixture?

Monoclonal antibodies are becoming a core aspect of the pharmaceutical industry. Together with a huge therapeutic potential, these molecules come with a structural complexity that drives state-of-the-art chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) to its limits. This article discusses the use of micro-pillar array columns in combination with mass spectrometry for peptide mapping of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibodyÐdrug conjugates (ADCs). Micro-pillar array columns are produced by a lithographic etching process creating a perfectly ordered separation bed on a silicon chip. As a result of the order existing in these columns, peak dispersion is minimized and highly efficient peptide maps are generated, providing enormous structural detail. Using examples from the author’s laboratory, the performance of these columns is illustrated.

LCGC Europe
Events

March 01, 2018

Analytica will take place from 10–13 April 2018 at the Messe München, in Munich, Germany. The Analytica conference is a highlight of Analytica and will take place at the International Congress Center (ICM) from 10–12 April 2018.

LCGC Europe

Gas chromatography makes use of a wide variety of detection methods. In addition to the most often used flame-ionization detection (FID), electron-capture detection (ECD), thermal conductivity detection (TCD), and mass-selective detection (MSD), the list of other detection methods is long. They really shine when deployed properly, but their properties and applications can be a bewildering alphabet soup. This instalment presents a compendium of gas chromatography (GC) detection methods, both past and vanished as well as those that are current and relevant to today’s separation challenges.

Issue PDF
LCGC Europe

March 01, 2018

Click the title above to open the LCGC Europe March 2018 regular issue, Vol 31, No 3, in an interactive PDF format.