ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Pushing the Envelope in Capillary Gas Chromatography

February 25, 2010
Steve Brown

E-Separation Solutions

E-Separation Solutions-03-02-2010, Volume 0, Issue 0

This Tuesday morning session will be presided over by Matthew Klee of Agilent Technologies (Wilmington, Delaware), who also arranged the session. Capillary gas chromatography (GC) continues to be a workhorse separations technique in the analytical laboratory.

Session 1060

Room 207C

This Tuesday morning session will be presided over by Matthew Klee of Agilent Technologies (Wilmington, Delaware), who also arranged the session. Capillary gas chromatography (GC) continues to be a workhorse separations technique in the analytical laboratory.

The session will open with introductory remarks from Klee. The first presentation in the session, “Characterization of Ionic Liquids for Chemical Analysis,” will be given by Daniel Armstrong of the University of Texas (Arlington). Armstrong, known for his work with chiral stationary phases, will discuss ionic liquids, which have received increasing attention in fields such as organic chemistry, electrochemistry, catalysis, physical chemistry, and engineering.

Next, John V. Seeley of Oakland University (Rochester, Michigan) will present a talk titled “Rational Stationary Phase Selection for Effective GCxGC Group-Type Separations.” Multidimensional GC separation techniques have been employed more widely, especially with the commercialization of the technology.

The next presentation, to be given by Aviv Amirav of Tel Aviv University, is titled “Pushing the Performance Envelope of Gas Chromatography — From Sample Collection to Data Analysis.” Amirav’s research interests include novel analytical instrumentation for detecting and analyzing pollutants in the environment as well as pharmaceuticals and drugs in biological fluids.

Milton L. Lee of Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah) will then present “Gas Chromatographic Sampling Technologies for Speed and Portability.” Lee’s areas of study have ranged from analytical, bioanalytical, and environmental research to techniques such as capillary chromatography, electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and microfluidics.

The final presentation in the session will be given by Jim Luong of The Dow Chemical Company (Midland, Michigan) and is titled “Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography and Capillary Flow Technology — Practical Industrial Applications.” Luong will further demonstrate the benefits of multidimensional separation.

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